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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the s
to understand what is at stake and who stood where. it's an old civil rights song. what side are you on. if it comes to that, that's exactly what the american people need to say, not to democrats, not to republicans, but to american people. that's who's going to be impacted by this. when you don't give your un employment check, when your payroll tax goes up, when your paycheck is not what it was, that's going to be to the american people. we will then have the bipartisanship because everybody is going to suffer together. >> you better believe it. >> and the republicans keep saying they're worried for the 2014 vote. well, let's get a vote and think of what's going to happen in 2014. >> dr. james peterson and maria theresa, thanks for your time tonight. both of you have a happy new year: >> thanks, reverend. happy new year to you, too. >> whoever said the republicans haven't accomplished anything, they are finishing something in first place today. >> "politics nation" has voted and we have the top political picture of the year. it's a good one. that's next. [ laughter ] smoke? nah, i'm go
look at the civil rights movement, that started with emmittville, montgomery. montgomery was supposed to be a boycott. people on the ground who begin to drive this issue. the conversation can't start in washington. washington is an aftereffect. it has to start with the people in various places driving them to move. if that doesn't happen, they will not move. >> you're absolutely right. that is the history of movements in america. but there is going to be a bill we know senator dianne feinstein is going to introduce a bill on the first day of the new congress. why shouldn't more folks get behind that, including some republicans? because i'd like to remind you of one thing. justice scalia said in the heller decision, like most rights the second amendment is not unlighted. -- not unlimited. he said, it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever for whatever purpose. from the high priest of the supreme court of conservatism himself. why doesn't that create some room for current conservatives like ronald reagan did in 1994 to back an assault weapons ban
, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lot more to it than that, but i'll leave it at that, and learn from his circumstances but had this to say about his trial -- nobody who covered the case or reported it had the time or took the time study the allegations, the accusere accuserers, the inconsistent, and the method. justice and fairness were
of the 1964 civil rights act. not all of it, just the problem part. i say there's only one -- [inaudible] in this so i'm not picking and choosing. quote: no person in the unite shall on the -- in the united states shall on the basis of color or national origin be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. that's what happened to abigail fisher. it's not disputed. she was treated different lit because of -- differently because of her race, color and national origin. now, we're not going to be talking so much about title vi tomorrow, we're going to be talking about the constitution because the supreme court said, well, that doesn't really mean what it says, you know? we think that it just means what the constitution means. and the constitution is, you know, has a little more egg l room,al -- wiggle l room,al l though not a lot. the constitution outlawed, i mean, the whole purpose of the equal protection or the 14th amendment was to outlaw racially-separate legal standards. that seems pretty straightforward too. and, you k
in the south. one of the things that happened after the civil rights movement is we saw more and more of the institutions that were about political education, that were not just about pipelining black, particularly blooek leaders who were going to look at and develop an understand the policies that were necessary for the black community. in order for it to thrive. we have actually seen a demobilization of that infrastructure. so when we have this conversation like 30% of blaeks voting for strom thurmond, one of the things we have to think about is, we're responding to, this is the guy that made the phone call or wrote the letter that helped me out. it's a different kind of political education and engagement than saying -- what actually fixes some of the things that we need fixed in our community? how are we assessing our political leadership on that basis? that's something that's actually extremely important and we've been seeing less and less of it in many black communities. >> i want to agree with my friend, mayor reed. the republican party is a learning party and it knows it has to
disputes. things like the civil rights fights of the 1960s. now it is routine. it requires really 60 votes to do anything in the senate. we have this intense level of party line voting with the filibuster. it's like a parliament system without majority rule. then you have the informal analog to that in the house which the majority party says, we're not going to bring anything up. it has to have 218 votes but it has to have a majority of the majority which gives a veto to the republican wing of the conservative party. that's where we'restick stuck right now. >> let's bring in lisa dejardan. is there in this particular case -- >> reporter: i'm hesitant to get into it because it gets into senate procedure. the simplest would be if the leaders agree not to invoke that 60-vote requirement. if they agree a majority would be enough. for that to work, the rest of the senate would then have to essentially allow it to. there would have to be no one that attempts a filibuster. that's the easiest way to get around the 60 votes. another way is to possibly use some sort of budget measure that could be p
country, of abuses of government. during the civil rights era, the government snooped on activists. during the vietnam era, the government snooped on antiwar protesters. in a digital age where computers can process billions of bits of information, we want the government to have unfettered access to every detail of our lives. from your visa statement, the government can determine what diseases you may or may not have, whether you're i am potent, manic, depressed, whether you're a gun owner, whether you buy ammunition, whether you're an animal rights activist, whether you're an environmental activist, what books you order, what blogs you read, what stores or internet sites you look at. do you really want your government to have free and unlimited access to everything you do on your computer? the fourth amendment was written in a different time and a different age, but its necessity and its truth are timeless. the right to privacy, and for that matter, the right to private property are not explicitly mentioned in the constitution, but the ninth amendment says that the rights not stated are no
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
, qaddafi fell, everything was over. now looks like the syrian civil war could go on for years. right now, patti ann, about 45,000 people killed there sectarian violence continues and that number could easily double. back to you. patti ann: leland, thank you. gregg: a disturbing case of deja vu as a man is pushed to his death right in front of a new york city subway for the second time this month. an update on the hunt for his killer. patti ann: glow glowing tribute to a man remembered as one of the great military leaders of his generation. lawmakers and leaders stop to honor general norman schwarzkopf could have, the man who led desert storm, perhaps better known by his nickname storm minute norman ti. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewi
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)